Errors When trying to install Monocle-Gateway.exe



  • Yes it worked several months ago on the Spot. I just bought the tablet. I am trying Hikvision Microseven and some noname ip cameras. This time I do not see Monocle running as a service?

    7471d22e-7bdb-46c1-9854-e59f1b112d26-image.png



  • I have checked the URL’s that I am using and I am able to pull up a stream using VLC on all of them.



  • @pedenfield

    OK, the startup looks good in the log.
    Capture the log while asking “Alexa, show me the XXX camera” and let’s see what happens.

    Thanks, Robert



  • 7f55b3eb-b50f-4c10-b8fb-b3c1e0633f03-image.png



  • @pedenfield

    OK, so immediately after the “INITIALIZE RTSP” section, you should see incoming TCP requests from the Alexa devices. In this log they are missing, which means the Alexa devices are not able to connect/communicate with the Monocle Gateway.

    1.) Are the Alexa devices on the same network as the Monocle Gateway. (not on a separate VLAN or on a Guest Wifi, etc)
    2.) Check (or disable) the Windows Firewall to make sure it’s allowing port 443 to be used by Monocle Gateway.
    3.) What type of router are you using? Some routers will block DNS resolution of public DNS hostnames that resolve to internal/private IP addresses. (See DNS REBINDING)
    4.) Is the auto-detected IP address of 192.168.0.110 correct for the Monocle Gateway. The Alexa device will use this to connect.

    Thanks, Robert



    1. Same network.
      2, Disabled my Trend Micro firewall
    2. Router is a TP-Link Wireless Router Touch-P5
    3. Yes. That is the Pc Monocle is installed on.


  • @pedenfield

    Are you using PiHole or any other DNS server on your network?

    Thanks, Robert



  • No. I am using NoIP because I can’t get static IP.



  • @pedenfield

    In the startup of the log file look for the “FQDN” entry. This is the unique hostname that is assigned to your gateway instance and registered as a publicly resolvable DNS entry.
    Open a command prompt on your Windows machine and enter the following command:

    nslookup xxx.mproxy.io
    

    (where xxx.mproxy.io is your FQDN.)

    It should return a result with your gateway’s local IP address. 192.168.0.110

    If you don’t get this IP address, then something is blocking the DNS resolution of that domain name. Most likely your router or DNS server is blocking resolutions to local IP addresses (DNS REBIND).

    Make sure to try this nslookup test on the gateway machine as well as another computer on the same network if possible. Basically we are trying to make sure that the Alexa devices on the network would also be able to resolve this hostname by simulating the DNS resolution from another device attached to the network.

    Let’s start with this test and see what happens.

    Thanks, Robert



  • I think I have the FQDN number right.

    321a18ee-f0ba-45da-9327-5a22cdda849a-image.png

    e69ecc05-f57d-43f9-a0bd-39396fde2842-image.png



  • 2nd computer result

    C:\Users\Gerri>nslookup 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io
    Server: UnKnown
    Address: 192.168.0.1

    *** No internal type for both IPv4 and IPv6 Addresses (A+AAAA) records available for 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io

    C:\Users\Gerri>nslookup 192.168.0.110
    Server: UnKnown
    Address: 192.168.0.1

    *** UnKnown can’t find 192.168.0.110: Non-existent domain



  • 192.168.0.118 computer is now showing this

    C:\Users\Paul>nslookup 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io
    Server: UnKnown
    Address: 192.168.0.1

    *** No internal type for both IPv4 and IPv6 Addresses (A+AAAA) records available for 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io



  • @pedenfield

    So this confirms that DNS is the issue.

    Here is what I get when attempting the same test:

    $ nslookup 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io
    Server:		172.20.10.1
    Address:	172.20.10.1#53
    
    Non-authoritative answer:
    Name:	2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io
    Address: 192.168.0.110
    

    So you see, I’m getting the actual resolved address of 192.168.0.110 which is correct.

    You can also try the same command using Google DNS server at 8.8.8.8:

    $ nslookup 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io 8.8.8.8
    Server:		8.8.8.8
    Address:	8.8.8.8#53
    
    Non-authoritative answer:
    Name:	2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io
    Address: 192.168.0.110
    

    So the issue is most likely your router which I assume is at address 192.168.0.1 based on your previous attempts.
    The router is probably blocking resolution of the DNS hostname to a local IP address.
    You will need to lookup instructions for how to allow a specific hostname (2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io) to be allowed and not blocked.

    Thanks, Robert



  • Thanks. I will do some checking and let you know what I find. You have been most helpful…



  • @pedenfield

    When trying to research this for your router, the keyword “DNS REBIND” or “DNS REBINDING” is what this behavior is typically called. It’s a security measure that some routers implement.

    Thanks, Robert



  • @pedenfield said in Errors When trying to install Monocle-Gateway.exe:

    nslookup 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io

    Using Google it the lookup works

    C:\Users\Paul>nslookup 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io 8.8.8.8
    Server: dns.google
    Address: 8.8.8.8

    Non-authoritative answer:
    Name: 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io
    Address: 192.168.0.110



  • @Monocle said in Errors When trying to install Monocle-Gateway.exe:

    2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io

    Ping works also

    C:\Users\Paul>ping 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io

    Pinging 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io [192.168.0.110] with 32 bytes of data:
    Reply from 192.168.0.110: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.0.110: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.0.110: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.0.110: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

    Ping statistics for 192.168.0.110:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms



  • @pedenfield

    The Google lookup worked so that means that your assigned FQDN is valid and publicly resolvable.
    However, once you resolved it, it is now cached for a little while on your local system/computer.

    The ping is now working because the DNS hostname is now cached on your local machine.
    If you go back and try to resolve it again after a while (without the Google DNS server) just using your default DNS servers, it will probably fail to resolve the hostname again.

    You can use the following command to force a flush of your local DNS cache (on Windows).

    ipconfig /flushdns
    

    I don’t see a way to manually add additional DNS servers to the Alexa Echo device, so the FQDN will need to be resolvable by your router.

    Thanks, Robert



  • You are exactly right; but you knew that. During that short time i was able to see 2 cameras on the spot but not the tablet. I’ll keep working.



  • @pedenfield

    Also, some routers will allow you to simply override a DNS host to a fixed address of your choosing. This could also be an option for you if your router allows that. You would just use the hostname 2b49b758-a6fd-4a36-a6ac-29b674ff1ce5.mproxy.io and have it pointed to the gateway’s IP address (192.168.0.110). So instead of the router actually resolving the address from a public DNS record, it just returns the overridden IP locally.

    Thanks, Robert


Log in to reply